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Necessary House
Pickering Passage
Grant School

LEGACY OF COMMUNITY EFFORTS

The Grant School opened in the fall of 1914 for grades 1 through 8, with 13 students, 10 from Spencer Lake, which had closed earlier that same year.

Miss Kennedy was the first teacher for the one-room school house.  A wood-burning potbelly stove heated the classroom.  The “necessary house” was out back, a cold trip on winter days and not a place to linger.

In 1939, a play shed that had been built on the property earlier, was moved on skid logs pulled by horses and a stump puller. It was then attached to the original building.  All work was done by neighborhood volunteers. This provided an area for children to play without going outside.  The last class, with only three students enrolled, was in 1942.

In the mid-30's, the Pickering Homemakers Club was organized by women from the Pickering Road neighborhood. Meetings were held in private homes.  Recipes comparison , needlework and quilting were major activities.  Afternoon coffees provided the perfect platform to discuss problems and concerns of the neighborhood.

SCHOOL'S OUT FOR GOOD

In 1946, the Pickering Homemakers Club, alumni and residents of the neighborhood were concerned about the future of this old school.  No one seemed to want the responsibility of the  upkeep.

By this time, the Pickering Homemakers had incorporated, thereby giving it a solid community presence.  They agreed to take over the stewardship of the old school, taking responsibility for its upkeep and continued preservation. Subsequently, the property was deeded to the Pickering Homemakers Club and their meetings and activities were shifted to the school.  Sometime later, the masculine gender joined the membership as the “homemakers” responsibilities began to include building repairs, roof replacement and social events.  The school was also used as a precinct polling site.

CHANGING TIMES

No longer are the quilting frames or the treadle sewing machines in evidence. The potbelly stove which heated the school until a few years ago, is still an important part of the unique historic schoolroom.  Other original items include
the single and double desks, blackboards, an old piano, circa 1900 maps and many schoolbooks.

ENTER PICKERING COMMUNITY CLUB

In 2006, the Pickering Homemakers Club, Inc. received approval to utilized “Doing Business As” (DBA) the Pickering Community Club, which reflects community involvement, broader goals and uses for the school.


HISTORIAN: The Grant School has seen much in it's 100 year history. With questions regarding our history and what part it has played in the Pickering community, please write our Historian - ( Historian@TheGrantSchool.org )

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